Winnipesaukee Forum

Winnipesaukee Forum (https://www.winnipesaukee.com/forums/index.php)
-   General Discussion (https://www.winnipesaukee.com/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=3)
-   -   Cyanobacteria (https://www.winnipesaukee.com/forums/showthread.php?t=27336)

Lakegeezer 08-13-2021 04:56 PM

Cyanobacteria?
 
1 Attachment(s)
When I went to swim today, I noticed a lot of flakes in the water column and wonder if it is cyanobacteria. I wasn't willing to risk swimming in it and hope it disappears. Can anyone confirm that from the picture? I'd normally notify DES but found it after hours.

The Lake Winnipesaukee Association put out a warning recently for cyanobacteria in Mirror Lake and also seen at Pine Island, Bear Island and
Wolfeboro Bay. Perhaps it is more wide spread.

White dots in the photo are more green in person and are distributed throughout the visible water column.

Jeanzb1 08-14-2021 06:24 AM

This happens every year around this time. Yes, it is a form of Cyanobacteria. And, yes, it is called Gloeotrichia. Google it.


Sent from my iPad using Winnipesaukee Forum mobile app

mswlogo 08-14-2021 09:30 AM

So is it unsafe to swim in?

I'm surprised it's showing up on schedule with such a cool and wet July

I don't recall seeing it on NewFound lake.

FlyingScot 08-14-2021 02:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mswlogo (Post 360550)
So is it unsafe to swim in?

I'm surprised it's showing up on schedule with such a cool and wet July

I don't recall seeing it on NewFound lake.

Yes--it is unsafe. Cyanobacteria is a neurotoxin, dangerous for humans, dogs, and others. To say it's showing up on schedule suggests this is somehow natural or normal--it is only normal in the sense that as we let too much phosphorous into the lake, the lake is very likely to repay us with cyanobacteria and milfoil.

High amounts of rain, high lake water levels, shoreline development, boat wakes, roads without modern water handing, and high air temperatures all contribute here. We can't control the rain or air, but we can address many of these other issues.

As mishman noted, Lake Winnipesaukee Association is working hard to protect the lake from these things. Worth a look at their website for those interested https://www.winnipesaukee.org/

TheProfessor 08-14-2021 02:26 PM

What about Lake Kanasatka ?

Jeanzb1 08-14-2021 03:19 PM

From what I have read, Gloeotrichia is in every lake in New England. Would I swim in the blue green algae? Hell no! But I wouldn’t let this stuff keep me out of the lake.


Sent from my iPad using Winnipesaukee Forum mobile app

FlyingScot 08-14-2021 03:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jeanzb1 (Post 360569)
From what I have read, Gloeotrichia is in every lake in New England. Would I swim in the blue green algae? Hell no! But I wouldn’t let this stuff keep me out of the lake.


Sent from my iPad using Winnipesaukee Forum mobile app

Agreed. It is increases in phosphorous and temperature that cause it to bloom into quantities that are visible/harmful.

FlyingScot 08-14-2021 03:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TheProfessor (Post 360567)
What about Lake Kanasatka ?

Here's an email I got as a member of Lake Winnipesaukee Association. Cyanobacteria is elevated in Kanasatka, but is not yet dangerous. Keep an eye out there and in Blackey Cove


ATTENTION BLACKEY COVE RESIDENTS

In follow up to the NHDES red cyanobacteria advisory for Lake Kanasatka, LWA staff, NHDES and Moultonborough Conservation Commission members collected samples at the outlet of the Rt.25 dam and the inlet to Blackey Cove this morning. DES analyzed the samples and reports the following results.

Outlet at the Dam (Site A): 3,250 cells/mL
Inlet to Blackey Cove (Site B): 4,000 cells/mL

The same species of Cyanobacteria (Dolichospermum) was observed, but the concentrations are well below the state threshold for a warning or advisory. Advisories are issued when cyanobacterial cell concentrations exceed 70,000 cells/mL.

Blackey Cove residents please be on the lookout and report any suspected blooms.



If you suspect a waterbody is experiencing a cyanobacterial bloom: Call or text the hotline at (603) 848-8094 or email HAB@des.nh.gov and follow these steps to minimize immediate risks:
Don’t wade or swim or drink the water.​
Keep pets or livestock out;
Wash your hands if you’ve made contact.
Please advise anyone, especially pets and children, to avoid consuming or coming into contact with the water where any conditions are present.

Blooms can appear and disappear quickly and move around the lake with wind, currents, weather and boat traffic. The photos below are of the Kansatka bloom, and should be used to help everyone identify what they are looking for.

To learn more about cyanobacteria and cyanotoxins: CLICK HERE

Please feel free to call (603) 581-6632 or e-mail mail@winnipesaukee.org with any additional questions.

Thank You,

Bree Rossiter
Conservation Program Manager

Lake Winnipesaukee Association
P.O. Box 1624, Meredith, NH, 03253
(603) 581-6632

Lakegeezer 08-16-2021 04:53 PM

Gloeotrichia
 
I sent a sample to DES and got this reply. "Yes, these are the Gloeotrichia. Cyanobacteria Sightings Reported - Gloeotrichia | NH Department of Environmental Services This is not a high concentration yet. Watch out for layers that create brownish surface scums."

Winni Luvr 08-18-2021 04:34 PM

question
 
Does a certain website update daily and let you know what part of the Lake is effected by this? I plan on going fishing and swimming in Moultonborough on our upcoming vacation and I would be really sad if we couldn't. I also would be sad if any of us got sick because we went in the water.

FlyingScot 08-18-2021 05:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Winni Luvr (Post 360816)
Does a certain website update daily and let you know what part of the Lake is effected by this? I plan on going fishing and swimming in Moultonborough on our upcoming vacation and I would be really sad if we couldn't. I also would be sad if any of us got sick because we went in the water.

Unfortunately, no. But both DES and Lake Winnipesaukee Association are monitoring as much as they can. You might want to join LWA, or at least join their Facebook group. This year's conditions are ideal for cyanobacteria--high water levels cause extra erosion and phosphorous to enter the lake, then high heat promotes growth.

The good news is that cyanobacteria blooms are readily visible by the time they are dangerous--if you see big clouds of green, don't go in or over it. If the water looks normal, you are not in danger. You can Google for images too

mowtorman 08-18-2021 07:56 PM

New invasive species
 
2 Attachment(s)
My posting from 8/24/20

"Cyanobacteria which is toxic and associated with ALS (see Mascoma Lake DHMC) is in Kanasatka this summer. Once introduced it thrives on Nitrogen and Phosphorus. Kanasatka is 9' above Winnipesaukee so where do you think it is headed? If you have good flow, low population and low animal populations you are obviously better off. Point is the lake is taking a pounding and without the opportunity to flush over the winter it wouldn't be much better than Lilly Pond."

So Cyanobacteria is established now in Winnipesaukee in 2021. I would bet the next invasive species in Winnipesaukee will be Zebra Mussels.

NH has avoided Zebra Mussels so far but won't be able to much longer as they are already in Vermont, Maine and Massachusetts. There is no way to combat them as they cluster on your dock posts and outdrives as the boat sits at the dock. They have not been the environmental disaster they were predicted to be. Many people vacationing bring their boats to both Lake Winnipesaukee and Lake Champlain. Many bass tournaments are held on both lakes. Many boats are launched off trailers very early before lake hosts arrive on duty to check for invasive species. It's like Lake Seymour in the Northeast Kingdom of Vermont trying to hold off against Eurasian Milfoil.

It is not a matter of if it is a matter of when. The degradation of the lake will proceed as fast as we allow it to be loaded with Nitrogen and Phosphorus either from humans i.e. fertilizer or animals i.e. poop.

If you want to see a worst case scenario, take a look at the waterfront cottages in St. Albans Bay in Vermont. There is no way anyone would swim there, probably not even let your dog swim it's all full of reeds and algae and it stinks to high heaven on a 95 degree summer day. These cottages would have been highly sought after in their day and valuable, not so much now. Lake Champlain is a much different situation in that sewage overflows and it is also a superfund site from the coal gasification power plants years ago.

Without water quality you have nothing.

The picture below is St. Albans bay in the middle of a bg algae bloom.

NHskier 08-18-2021 08:25 PM

NH DES maintains a website with notices on lake water quality including cyanobacteria warnings: https://www4.des.state.nh.us/WaterShed_BeachMaps/

FlyingScot 08-19-2021 05:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Winni Luvr (Post 360816)
Does a certain website update daily and let you know what part of the Lake is effected by this? I plan on going fishing and swimming in Moultonborough on our upcoming vacation and I would be really sad if we couldn't. I also would be sad if any of us got sick because we went in the water.

Here's a new Lake Winnipesaukee Association cyanobacteria page with weekly reporting

https://www.winnipesaukee.org/news-e...oom-watch-map/


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:19 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11
Copyright ©2000 - 2022, vBulletin Solutions Inc.